Introducing the All-New Lightroom CC

Announced 18th October on the Adobe blog and at the MAX conference in Las Vegas: Adobe has made major updates to the Lightroom family of products. These changes are likely to have significant impact on many photographers’ workflows.

Firstly, the desktop application we’ve known as Lightroom up to this point is now called Lightroom Classic CC. Improvements have been made to performance and a few new features have been rolled out, such as Range Mask for local adjustments, but for the most part Classic remains the familiar tool we’ve used and loved all these years. Adobe has promised to continue their commitment to developing and supporting Classic.

But the really big news is about the all-new digital photography platform now called Adobe Lightroom CC (for Creative Cloud). Lightroom CC is a new set of apps that run on desktop and mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. (CC is now totally separate from Classic, but the two can communicate.)

Register for my next Lightroom CC workshop

At the core of Lightroom CC is cloud storage. Your photos are uploaded (and backed up automatically) using Adobe’s servers.

The apps run locally on your devices but there’s also a web interface that you can access via a browser.

Because your photos are all stored in the Creative Cloud, you can access and edit them across a range of devices using consistent tools within the Lightroom CC family of apps.

For the most part, reviewing and editing your photos is the same whether you’re using a desktop computer, tablet or smartphone, with a few notable exceptions (which are expected to improve over time).

Most importantly, Adobe has committed to providing consistency between the tools available in all versions of Lightroom CC running on all platforms.

What this all means is that it is now possible to securely store your photos in one location, access them from anywhere on many devices, and edit and share those photos—all using a consistent suite of software.

Register for my next Lightroom CC workshop

Mark Johnson releases Photoshop Workbench Volume Two

Photoshop Workbench Volume Two features episodes 201 – 250 of Mark Johnson’s world-renowned Photoshop Workbench series.  Representing more than 11 hours of inspiring and enlightening Photoshop CS4 and CS5 education, this DVD is an extraordinary value at only $24.95.

Mark’s friendly and conversational approach to teaching invites the viewer to explore a non-destructive editing style that encourages joyful and imaginative use of Photoshop. Topics span the gamut from creative to practical, including Spirographic Splendor, Photoshop CS5’s Pixel Bender Plug-In, and Fixing the Hairline Between a Replaced Sky and the Horizon.

Each Workbench is presented in its original quality and size (1024 x 768 pixels) and the Table of Contents is keyword searchable. To view the complete Table of Contents and to order, visit www.msjphotography.com.

Learn Lightroom in Hawaii

I’m teaching a two-day Lightroom class in Hilo, Hawaii Oct 9-10. Early registration discount ends this Friday, Sep 10. Register now and save $25! Details and registration are at www.LightroomClasses.com/hawaii

Lightroom Catalog Upgrades

Whenever you’re working within Lightroom, you’re working in a catalog. A Lightroom catalog contains all the information about the image files you’ve imported, as well as any adjustments you’ve made or metadata you’ve added to them. The catalog is a file residing on your hard disk; see figure below.

Lightroom Catalog Files

A catalog file is specific to the version of Lightroom that created it. For example, a Lightroom 2 catalog is different than a Lightroom 3 catalog. When you upgrade Lightroom between major versions (such as from v2 to v3) — and sometimes between “point versions” (such as from 3.0 to 3.2) — you also need to upgrade the catalog.

When you launch the new version of the program, Lightroom looks for the default (or most recent) catalog used, and if it finds an older version, you will be prompted to upgrade the catalog. You must allow this upgrade to be successfully performed before you can access your old data with the new program!

Lightroom Catalog Upgrade Dialog

During a catalog upgrade, the Lightroom installer copies your old catalog to a new file and then performs the upgrade to the copied catalog. As a result, you end up with two catalogs – one from the old version and one for the new version.

After you’ve performed a catalog upgrade and confirmed the integrity of all the data it contains, it’s imperative that you remove the old catalog(s) from your system. This will prevent accidentally opening the old catalog when you didn’t mean to.

If you have multiple catalogs from the old version of Lightroom, all of them will need to be upgraded to support the newer version, and then all the old catalogs should be deleted. (If this makes you nervous, back them up first.)

Also, at this point you should completely uninstall the old version of Lightroom.

If you ever launch Lightroom and are unexpectedly prompted to upgrade the catalog (and you haven’t just done a program upgrade)… STOP! If you’ve already upgraded this catalog, don’t do it again – you will just end up with more copies of the same catalog. One of the worst things you can do in Lightroom is work in multiple catalogs without knowing it!

You can always confirm the catalog that’s open by using the Catalog Settings command. On Mac, it’s located under the Lightroom menu at the top left of the screen. On Windows, it’s under the Edit menu.

Lightroom Catalog Settings

Getting Started with Lightroom

I’m teaching a Getting Started with Lightroom class at Boulder Digital Arts next Thursday, August 12.

This is an intro-level class for photographers new to Lightroom.

Details and registration are here.

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